We are developing USB 3.1 Gen2 HUB with PD supports

– USB-C 4 port USB HUB + 1 port USB-C PD input allows supports Laptop charge up to 60W.

– Data transfer rate up to 10G with 4 port USB

– Storage / HDMI / Giga LAN / Audio / Card Reader / DVI / VGA / Fiber

 

For USB 3.2 / USB 3.1 / USB 3.0 products please click here

 

USB 3.1

In January 2013 the USB group announced plans to update USB 3.0 to 10 Gbit/s (1.25 GB/s). The group ended up creating a new USB specification, USB 3.1, which was released on 31 July 2013, replacing the USB 3.0 standard. The USB 3.1 specification takes over the existing USB 3.0’s SuperSpeed USB transfer rate, also referred to as USB 3.1 Gen 1, and introduces a faster transfer rate called SuperSpeed USB 10 Gbps, referred to as USB 3.1 Gen 2, putting it on par with a single first-generation Thunderbolt channel. The new mode’s logo features a caption stylized as SUPERSPEED+. The USB 3.1 Gen 2 standard increases the maximum data signaling rate to 10 Gbit/s (1.25 GB/s), double that of SuperSpeed USB, and reduces line encoding overhead to just 3% by changing the encoding scheme to 128b/132b. The first USB 3.1 Gen 2 implementation demonstrated real-world transfer speeds of 7.2 Gbit/s.

The USB 3.1 standard is backward compatible with USB 3.0 and USB 2.0. It defines the following transfer modes:

USB 3.1 Gen 1 – SuperSpeed, 5 Gbit/s (0.625 GB/s) data signaling rate over 1 lane using 8b/10b encoding, the same as USB 3.0.
USB 3.1 Gen 2 – SuperSpeed+, new 10 Gbit/s (1.25 GB/s) data rate over 1 lane using 128b/132b encoding.

(Source: wiki)

 

USB 3.2

On 25 July 2017, a press release from the USB 3.0 Promoter Group detailed a pending update to the USB Type-C specification, defining the doubling of bandwidth for existing USB-C cables. Under the USB 3.2 specification, existing SuperSpeed certified USB-C 3.1 Gen 1 cables will be able to operate at 10 Gbit/s (up from 5 Gbit/s), and SuperSpeed+ certified USB-C 3.1 Gen 2 cables will be able to operate at 20 Gbit/s (up from 10 Gbit/s). The increase in bandwidth is a result of multi-lane operation over existing wires that were intended for flip-flop capabilities of the USB-C connector.

The USB 3.2 standard is backward compatible with USB 3.1/3.0 and USB 2.0. It defines the following transfer modes:

USB 3.2 Gen 1×1 – SuperSpeed, 5 Gbit/s (0.625 GB/s) data signaling rate over 1 lane using 8b/10b encoding, the same as USB 3.1 Gen 1 and USB 3.0.
USB 3.2 Gen 1×2 – SuperSpeed+, new 10 Gbit/s (1.25 GB/s) data rate over 2 lanes using 8b/10b encoding.
USB 3.2 Gen 2×1 – SuperSpeed+, 10 Gbit/s (1.25 GB/s) data rate over 1 lane using 128b/132b encoding, the same as USB 3.1 Gen 2.
USB 3.2 Gen 2×2 – SuperSpeed+, new 20 Gbit/s (2.5 GB/s) data rate over 2 lanes using 128b/132b encoding.
In May 2018, Synopsys demonstrated the first USB 3.2 Gen 2×2 connection, where a Windows PC was connected to a storage device, reaching a speed of 1.6 GB/s average.

USB 3.2 is supported with the default Windows 10 USB drivers and in Linux Kernel 4.18.

(Source: wiki)